Monday Blogwhoring

by matttbastard

Love endures forever, like a candy apple grey cockroach waiting for the end of a nuclear winter.

(Bow down to the Queen Cunt of Fuck Mountain, brethren.)

Baghdad Burning: Bloggers Without Borders… (h/t Michael van der Galiën)

Shiraz Socialist: Biji Kurdistan

All About Race: Faith in Color: Kneejerk Interpretations

Zuky: Guest Post — M’s Roundup on Health, Law, Cosby (goddamn, but nobody link farms like TBFKAS)

My Private Casbah: Jugend Dient Dem Führers (of the USA government) and More on Martin Lee Anderson: The Disability Aspect

Idealistic Pragmatist: What makes for an effective opposition in a minority parliament?

Birth Pangs: Misogyny and State Murder

The Fifth Column: Why We Need FPTP

They Call Me “Mister Sinister”: Harper’s Little Buddy

Politique Vert: How The NDP Can Win The Next Election and Harper and Layton: Too Close For Comfort

Shakesville: Huckabee is a Disingenuous Coward (preach!)

Abandoned Stuff: Killing us Softly 3

misscripchick’s weblog: this makes me tired

Marginal Notes: 2010: The Year of the Sex Olympics

Comment is free: Blowing the whistle on the Iraq war

The Belgravia Dispatch: “Serious Consequences”

Too Sense: Giuliani Campaign Staffer A Big Fan Of The “N-Word”

the field negro: Nas And the “N” word (h/t dNA)

a k8, a cat, a mission: All new LOLsomething: the LOLfetus (h/t Lilith Attack)

Blue Gal: It’s a woman/man thing. We wouldn’t understand

Recommend this post at Progressive Bloggers

Advertisements

Thursday Blogwhoring

by matttbastard

(Inspired by Melissa McEwen)

bastard-approved blogreading for a quiet Thursday evening:

Plucky Punk: Meanwhile…

Angry Black Bitch: By Request – A new book…another cure?

Impolitical: Stephen Harper is not a cowboy

The Heretik: This Is Not Torture

A Tiny Revolution: Jeffrey Goldberg, Five Years Ago Today and How Lucky We Are To Live In A World With So Many Moral Men

Rox Populi: Let Rush Be Rush on AFN

All About Race: Faith in Color: Study to Answer

Peace, order and good government, eh?: What do the superrich want with all that?

Hope and Onions: Stand not amaz’d: the prince will doom thee death (Also see Foul deeds will rise)

Birth Pangs: Damn Thanksgiving!

Creekside: The reign of Steyn falls mainly on the plain

TransAdvocate: Associated Press: Please Follow Your Own Stylebook

Slap Upside The Head!: The Gay-less Countries

They Call Me “Mister Sinister”: Lorrie Goldstein And The Way Ahead

Shiraz Socialist: So many good causes (so support at least one of them)

Zen Pundit: Trying To Reopen A Question Settled In 1865

Jon Swift: Clarence Thomas: An Angry Black Man

First Draft: Mocking the killing of a mockingbird

Automatic Preference: Knotting and Unknotting

Shakesville: The New Misogyny: “I’ll Be Over Here Behind the Big Butts and Black Girls”

The Newshoggers: 2,400 Miners Rescued In South Africa

I Never Leave The House Without Incident: What activism looks like when it’s done right

Leftist Looney Lunchbox: Blog Herstory

Slant Truth: On Civil Rights Leaders That Are Loved and Conveniently Dead

Obsidian Wings: Beyond Parody

Waging Peace: On Second Thought,

Fetch Me My Axe: The 80’s, and other early harbingers of the Apocalypse

Taking It Outside: Vietnam re-revisited

Recommend this post to Progressive Bloggers

They Call Him MISTER…

by matttbastard

I haven’t given him much link love lately, but Sinister Greg (one of the first Canadian bloggers I began to read on a regular basis) has really been on fire recently. Today the Sinister One points to this eloquent, pragmatic post from conservative pundit and MMP supporter Andrew Coyne (also published in today’s National Post), who ably explains why the long-term benefits of electoral reform should quell anxious partisan concerns of wary conservatives (small and capital ‘C’):

Living on a knife-edge does strange things to people. On the one hand, it leaves the parties in a perpetual fever of anticipation, convinced they have only to gain a few points in the polls to destroy their opponents. That is one reason the two federal conservative parties, Progressive Conservative and Reform, were so reluctant to merge. It is also the reason why minority governments tend, under our system, to be so unstable.

On the other hand, the consequences of losing a few points makes them excessively, almost neurotically cautious, unwilling to take the slightest risk or advocate the mildest change, but each hugging as close as it can to the median voter, the status quo and each other. Hence the dominance of the two brokerage parties, indistinguishable in philosophy — alike, that is, in the lack of it.

Put the two together, and you have much of Canadian politics — viciously partisan, yet unspeakably trivial; much ado about nothing much. McGuintoryism, in short.
So the case for electoral reform, it seems to me, is one that conservatives, if not Conservatives, should find appealing. It is a cause that has tended, historically, to be identified with the left, not least in the current referendum debate; many conservatives have accordingly rejected it. Yet it is not the left that has suffered most under the current system. It’s the right.

By whatever combination of historical circumstances, the left has a party that will advance its ideas, free of the brokerage parties’ grip: the NDP. Though not often in government, outside of the West, it has succeeded in dragging the entire political spectrum to the left, its policies adopted by Liberal and Conservative governments alikes. Nothing like it exists on the right, federally or provincially, nor has since Reform’s demise. Nor is one likely to emerge, so long as “first past the post” remains the rule.

The same is true of parties less easily categorized, like the Green party. Though it is the party of choice for hundreds of thousands of Canadians, it has yet to win a seat, unable to concentrate its support geographically in the way that FPTP requires. How many more votes might it win if potential supporters were not disheartened at the prospect of “wasting” their votes, or worse, “splitting” the vote, as they are forever warned against doing?

But what if there were a system in which no votes were wasted, where vote-splitting ceased to be an issue? There is such a system, and it’s called proportional representation, of which the proposal before Ontarians is a variant. Not only the Greens, but other parties — libertarian, social-conservative, or other — might then have a fighting chance. The spectrum of acceptable ideas for debate would noticeably broaden.

Related: “Rock-ribbed conservative” Greg Staples (another early Canuckosphere fav of mine) dittos Coyne, and supplements with more pragmatism (the theme of the week, methinks):

I’ve already stated that I think the right-wing would split under proportional representation. In Ontario you would see a Tory party, a libertarian/conservative party and possibly a social conservative party. Nationally you could add a Bleu party. The (red) Tory party could become a natural home for the dissaffected centre-right Liberal and we would not be locked into the perpetual NDP wagging the Liberal dog.
All this and we would have actual policy debate. That why I’m signed up.

Vote for MMP

Recommend this post to Progressive Bloggers