McCain on Foreign Policy: Preserving the Status Quo?

by matttbastard

Big Media Matt disputes the notion that John McCain’s foreign policy record represents a departure from that of the outgoing administration.

Related: Fareed Zakaria on McCain’s “radical” foreign policy proposals:

We have spent months debating Barack Obama’s suggestion that he might, under some circumstances, meet with Iranians and Venezuelans. It is a sign of what is wrong with the foreign-policy debate that this idea is treated as a revolution in U.S. policy while McCain’s proposal [that the United States expel Russia from the G8 and exclude China from any expansion] has barely registered. What McCain has announced is momentous—that the United States should adopt a policy of active exclusion and hostility toward two major global powers. It would reverse a decades-old bipartisan American policy of integrating these two countries into the global order, a policy that began under Richard Nixon (with Beijing) and continued under Ronald Reagan (with Moscow). It is a policy that would alienate many countries in Europe and Asia who would see it as an attempt by Washington to begin a new cold war.

Check out the full text of McCain’s March 26th speech to the Los Angeles World Affairs Council, which, according to Zakaria, “[alternates] between neoconservative posturing and realist common sense…like it was written by two very different people, each one given an allotment of a few paragraphs on every topic.”

Recommend this post at Progressive Bloggers

Re: the Rise of the Right (Major League Asshole Edition)

by matttbastard

Dubya and Deadeye’s favourite political correspondent, Adam Clymer, talks about his new book, Drawing the Line at the Big Ditch: The Panama Canal Treaties and the Rise of the Right.

Recommend this post at Progressive Bloggers

No Torture, No Exceptions

by matttbastard

In the wake of September 11, the United States became a nation that practiced torture. Astonishingly-despite the repudiation of torture by experts and the revelations of Guantanamo and Abu Ghraib-we remain one… . What once was shocking is now ordinary.

Steve Xenakis, Peter Bergen and Carl Ford discuss the essays they wrote for a special issue of The Washington Monthly (PDF here) that calls upon the US to end its current pro-torture policy.

Related: Justine Sharrock has more on the impact ambiguous US interrogation policy had on soldiers who served in Iraq and became unwitting participants in a real life Stanford Prison Experiment.

Recommend this post at Progressive Bloggers